[Inventory] Australia’s top ten food import and export policies in 2020
By: Date: 2021-02-16 Categories: foodwarning Tags: ,
  Food Partner Network News In 2020, Australia has made many amendments to its food import and export policy. In this regard, FoodPartner.com has taken inventory and sorted out the main food policies for netizens to share.

  1. Australia issues industry advice notice on fresh produce
   On February 28, 2020, the Australian Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Environment issued the 31-2020 Import Industry Recommendation Notice. From May 1, 2020, it will no longer provide separation for fresh agricultural products imported from New Zealand and the United States. Offshore pre-shipment inspections (OPI). Goods on or before April 30, 2020 will be cleared according to OPI. Goods cleared by OPI must arrive in Australia before June 30, 2020. From July 1, 2020, all goods need to be handed over to the Australian Department of Agriculture, Water and Environment for arrival verification. In order to meet Australian import requirements, importers need to understand the import conditions of Australian fresh agricultural products, including:whether an import license is required; compulsory phytosanitary measures, such as fumigation and irradiation; phytosanitary declaration; packaging and labeling requirements; Conditions of cooperation with overseas suppliers; submit correct documents; schedule an inspection before the goods arrive, etc. Fresh agricultural products that do not meet the requirements will be prohibited from entering the country.
  2. The impact of Australia’s new crown pneumonia on imported food inspection plans
   On March 20, 2020, the Australian Department of Agriculture, Water Resources and Environment issued an announcement to explain to food importers and food operators the impact of the new crown pneumonia epidemic on imported food inspection plans, indicating that the regulatory authorities are working hard to control the new crown pneumonia pandemic In accordance with the “Imported Food Inspection Program” (IFIS), the latest information on current operations is provided. Its main contents include:IFS is now fully operational, including inspectors and document evaluation personnel. A series of safety measures have been implemented, including the use of personal protective equipment in accordance with the Australian Department of Health’s recommendations for border agencies. These measures ensure that inspectors, employees of companies conducting inspections, and other interactions with the wider community are adequately protected. The designated analyst recommends that the detection of food samples is currently unchanged. If the operation of IFIS is affected, the department will provide an update.
  3. Australia publishes requirements for exporting EU dairy products during the new crown virus epidemic
   On March 24, 2020, the Australian Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Environment issued No. 2020-07 on the requirements for exporting EU dairy products during the new crown virus epidemic. It is suggested that in the case where the original certificate cannot be submitted with the goods, a scanned copy of the export certificate can be used. This recommendation applies to all commodities (meat, meat by-products, dairy products, seafood, eggs, etc.).
  4. Australia issues temporary requirements for health certificates for imported animal products
   On April 9, 2020, the Australian Department of Agriculture issued Announcement No. 53-2020, which is the provisional requirement for health certificates for imported animal products during the new crown epidemic. Due to the recent development of the new crown epidemic, express shipments have been greatly affected, and importers cannot submit the original health certificate to the Australian border inspection agency in time. In order to ensure the import of goods, the Australian Department of Agriculture allows importers to submit electronic copies of the certificates for official inspection. In some cases, it also requires the competent authorities of the exporting country to verify the certificates. Australia will also hold importers responsible for providing false certificates. This temporary measure will last until July 1, 2020.
  5. Australia allows the import of processed grape leaf products
   On April 21, 2020, the Australian Department of Agriculture, Water and Environment issued an announcement that the department reviewed the biosafety risks associated with the import of processed grape leaves and now allows the import of grape leaves for human consumption. Imported edible grape leaf products must meet the following conditions:products that are pickled or packaged in salt water, vinegar, wine or oil; or sufficiently dry and resistant to storage; or kept at -18°C or lower for at least seven days and frozen Arrived in Australia. The announcement will take effect on April 21, 2020.
  6. Australia issues new regulations on cheese export to Saudi Arabia
   On April 21, 2020, the Australian Ministry of Agriculture, Water Resources and Environment issued the MAA 2020-13 notice, which states that Annatto is no longer allowed to be added to cheese exported to Saudi Arabia. According to the notice, the new technical regulations of the Saudi Arabian Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) on”additives allowed to be used in food” will come into effect on June 1, 2020. The new regulations do not allow the use of annatto in cheese.
  7. Australia publishes import conditions for unprocessed nuts for human consumption
   On June 18, 2020, the Australian Department of Agriculture, Water Resources and Resources issued import requirements for unprocessed nuts for human consumption. The specific content is as follows:(1) This type of product does not need to apply for an import license, but only the varieties listed in the access list can be imported; (2) Unprocessed nuts over 2 kg and transported in a container should be targeted for export before export. Pula beetle undergoes quarantine fumigation treatment, the treatment method is phosphine or methyl bromide fumigation, and the quarantine treatment method, effect, packaging method, etc. are described in the export phytosanitary certificate; (3) If it is not carried out before export shipment Quarantine treatment shall be fumigated in accordance with Australian official requirements during transportation or after arrival at the destination. This requirement is effective from the date of publication.
  8. Australia will implement paperless electronic certification for milk and dairy products exported to Japan
   On November 3, 2020, the Australian Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Environment issued the MAA 2020-24 notice, which will implement paperless electronic certification for milk and dairy products exported to Japan. According to the notice, after negotiations between the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW), the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) and the Australian Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Environment, all milk and dairy products will now be exported to Australia for paperless transactions through electronic certificates. Paper export certificates will no longer be available. Only the electronic certification issued by the eCert exchange is eligible for import customs clearance in Japan. The effective date of this notice is November 10, 2020.
  9. Australia revises imported food control order
   On November 25, 2020, the Australian Federal Register issued Announcement F2020C01044, the new version of the”Imported Food Control Order.” The main content of the order includes terms and definitions, classification and identification of high-risk foods, and import certificate requirements for high-risk foods. The annex also lists the list of imported high-risk foods, including beef and its products, which are likely to breed Listeria Cold-chain dairy products, shellfish and instant shellfish products, some fish, peanuts and pistachio products.
   This directive will take effect on the date of issuance, and the old version of the directive issued in 2019 (Announcement F2019L01233) will be invalidated at the same time.
  10. Australia revises import license requirements for legume vegetable seeds
   On December 15, 2020, the Australian Department of Agriculture, Water and Environment issued the 215-2020 Import Industry Recommendation Notice to amend the import license requirements for legume vegetable seeds. According to the notification, the legume vegetable seed crops involved include:celery, celery, fennel, parsnips and parsley. From March 30, 2021, the Australian Department of Agriculture, Water and Environment will introduce import license requirements for the aforementioned legume seeds imported for sowing and human consumption. Goods that have not obtained an import license on or after March 30, 2021, including those currently under consideration, will be instructed to export or need to be destroyed in an approved manner.
  This article was edited by Foodmatenet Food Information Center. If you have any questions, please contact [email protected]